Exhibition: Distant Neighbours - opening and Q and A with artist Lucy Wood

Through Distant Neighbours Lucy Wood ultimately wants to create a visual global book spanning decades, which will amount to an archive and testimony to human movement available to future generations, at the centre of this work is people’s story telling.

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Film festival

This event is part of the world’s first film festival dedicated to climate linked migration

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For the last ten years, Lucy Wood has been making work based on migration and borders, in installation, sculptural and filmic form. Join Wood as the discusses the films made in her ongoing series ‘Distant neighbours’ have been based on narratives of peoples’ experience of borders and migrating through these spaces.
Through Distant Neighbours Lucy Wood ultimately wants to create a visual global book spanning decades, which will amount to an archive and testimony to human movement available to future generations, at the centre of this work is people’s story telling.
Tyneside Cinema have commissioned Wood to make a new instalment in the Distant Neighbours series specifically for Gimme Shelter, reflecting in particular on the link between climate change and immigration and the need for empathy. The final installation will comprise of the new film alongside other previously created in the series, exhibited on several monitors stacked across the gallery space.
The film is set to document life in the confines of a Refugee Camp where people have come from somewhere but are going nowhere at the same time; stuck in a transient space. This particular camp in Jordan has been designed to be temporary and not to give people the opportunity to build a future; Jordanian authorities are nervous of permanence and have banned motorised transport. No cement is allowed only corrugated iron, no trees can be planted and no pavements can be laid.
There is no greenery in this vast desert landscape – a far cry from Syria where many rural people now displaced could grow their own fruit and vegetables and be semi self-sufficient. These residents therefore, are completely trapped by this landscape and totally dependent on their hosts.

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